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Recent Articles

The War on Science … Not?

For the last week or so, I’ve been reading, and re-reading, an article called perspective: It’s not a war on science. The reason I’ve been doing this is because I noticed that a number of people seemed to regard it…
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Red Team vs Blue Team

Having some kind of Red Team exercise, to test and challenge the climate science consensus, seems to be gaining a small amount of momentum. Steve Koonin (who I have discussed before) has an article in the Wall Street Journal called…
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A day of activism … sort of

I discovered via Rachel’s blog that today was Pedal on Parliament 2017 (Scotland, only). Rachel has a new post about the event in Abereen. It’s also the day for the Marches for Science. So, we thought we’d go and spend…
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Marches for Science

Tomorrow is the day of Marches for Science. The idea of a march for science has somewhat divided people, although along rather predictable lines. There’s concern that it will be seen as politicising science. There’s concern that it will be…
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The Earth from Saturn

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has taken an image of the Earth, through the rings of Saturn. I don’t think I really need to say anything more. Credit: NASA/Cassini…
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Reconciling ECS estimates – again

I’m heading home after giving a public talk, and have a bit of time to write about the recent Armour paper Projection and Prediction: Climate Sensitivity on the rise. It’s basically another attempt to reconcile energy balance estimates for climate…
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State of the blog

Since I’ve now been running this blog for four years, I thought it might be an opportunity to consider if I should make any changes. Things have certainly got a little quieter, which might simply be because I’m writing less,…
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Four years!

WordPress reminded me that I started this blog 4 years ago today. Not really sure what to make of that. I’d like to think that I’d have some kind of insights to share, but I don’t really think I do.…
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Emissions slowdown

I thought I would post this video of Glen Peters discussing the three years we’ve just had in which there has been near-zero growth in emissions. You can use a Kaya-like identity to try and understand what might be causing…
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Toys, pram, out!

It seems that Roger Pielke Jr is having a bit of a rant on Twitter about an interview Michael Mann gave about the recent Congressional Hearings. He accuses Michael Mann of lying about him and also suggests that he might…
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Research integrity

I noticed, via a tweet from Judith Curry, that the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee is holding an inquiry into inquiry into Research Integrity. I also encountered this written evidence by Michael J Kelly, Emeritus Prince Philip Professor…
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Why a reasonably stable climate?

Came across a nice paper today suggesting that Future climate forcing potentially without precedent in the last 420 million years, by Foster, Royer & Lunt (I say nice because I found it quite easy to understand, not because what it…
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It’s okay to lie?

The House of Commons Science and Technology committee have just concluded an inquiry into science communication. One of those who presented evidence was David Whitehouse of the Global Warming Policy Foundation. David Whitehouse’s evidence focussed mainly on science journalism, and…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Democratising science

I got into a brief discussion on Twitter about democratising science, which some people seemed to think was a good idea. One thing I was trying to do was simply to work out what people meant. I’m still not sure,…
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Bias in science

There are quite often claims that there are significant biases in science and that this is strongly influencing research results. Typically this is based on known problems in certain fields; the replication crisis in psychology, or the failure to publish…
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Based on Observations Only!

The Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), who I’ve written about many times before, have released a report which they’ve described as [t]he World’s first state of the climate survey based on observations only. I think it’s meant to the a…
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A reduced climate sensitivity!

Now that I have your attention, I should probably make clear that this post is not about the Earth. I’m just back from a meeting where one of the speakers was Ian Boutle, lead author of a paper in which…
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The feedback paradox

Realclimate has a new post, by Ramus Benestad, that discusses predcitable and unpredictable behaviour. It focuses a little on Judith Curry’s recent report about climate models, that I discussed here. The Realclimate post is well worth reading, and I encourage…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Matt Ridley responds to Tim Palmer

I came across a response, by Matt Ridley, to Tim Palmer’s talk. I’ve posted Matt Ridley’s response below. One interesting aspect of his response is that it is written as if he is someone with the expertise to actually debate…
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Informing versus convincing

I want to clarify something about yesterday’s post that seems to have at least got one person up in arms. The key point that I was trying to get across (and that I think is the same as Michael Tobis’s…
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Scientists are not salespeople!

Gavin Schmidt posted a bunch of tweets in response to a post by Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) in which he claims to illustrate how climate scientists can persude skeptics. It you want to read Gavin’s tweet, Greg Laden has…
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The Ivory Tower

This is a post I’ve been thinking about for a while, and my thoughts are still not fully fleshed out, but I’ll have a go at writing it anyway. You sometimes encounter a suggestion that academics regard themselves as living…
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Advocacy and scientific credibility

To the surprise of few, I suspect, it appears that scientists can advocate without damaging their, or the scientific community’s, credibility. It’s reported in this paper, [d]oes Engagement in Advocacy Hurt the Credibility of Scientists? and is discussed in this…
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Oh no, not again

Somehow a paper arguing that the increase in atmospheric CO2 is mostly natural has managed to pass peer-review. Gavin’s already covered it in a Realcimate post. Gavin Cawleys paper is, in a sense, a pre-emptive response to this new paper.…
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Intellectual monocultures

I came across an article that I’ve been thinking about for a few days. I thought I would simply post some thoughts. They may not be well-formed, and my views could certainly change. I should say that I got it…
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Guest post: On Baselines and Buoys

One of the key criticisms of Karl et al. (2015) is that it used a dataset that adjusted buoy data up to ship data – the suggestion being that, in doing so, they produced more apparent warming than if the…
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