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Nature Scientific Reports

Michael Brown made me aware of a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports by Valentina Zharkova called Oscillations of the baseline of solar magnetic field and solar irradiance on a millennial timescale. Michael has, in the past, been critical of…

The Black Knight

I’ve been engaging in some discussions with people I shall politely call climate “skeptics”. It struck me that it’s a bit like the classic Black Knight scene from Monty Python. Start off being polite and complimentary. The resonse is unpleasant…

Vienna

I’m spending a couple of weeks in Vienna while attending a workshop on planet formation. Spent yesterday doing a bike tour, and wine tasting, in the Wachau Valley, and then spent today visiting some of the attractions in Vienna. The…

Rachel’s Bike

Rachel used to hang around with us at AT’s. She also moderated the blog for a while. She runs a blog in which she talks about her life in Scotland, with a focus on living a low-carbon life, especially biking…

Kooninisms

Gavin Schmidt has a Realclimate post about a recent talk given by Steve Koonin. Somewhat bizarrely, Koonin has a response to Gavin’s post that he has posted on WUWT. Given that Koonin has no climate expertise, presumably he thinks that…

Extreme weather event attribution

This is a joint post between myself and Eric Winsberg, Professor of Philosophy at the University of South Florida. Eric has just published, together with Naomi Oreskes and Elisabeth Lloyd, a paper called Severe Weather Event Attribution: Why values won’t…

Estragon and the Expert

An abstract stakeholder’s dialog. [V] You have cancer.[E] OK.[V] …[E] Is it curable.[V] Yes, I guess.[E] …[V] …[E] How[V] There’s A or B.[E] What would you suggest.[V] If you do A [inaudible], if you do B [inaudible].[E] Sure, but what…

A human extinction denier?

Mike Hulme has a new essay that some are promoting on Twitter. He suggests that he is a human extinction denier and objects to the climate emergency narrative. Although I have my own concerns about some of the extreme rhetoric,…

Promises and perils of the Paris agreement?

A few people were sharing, on Twitter, a Science article called Promises and Perils of the Paris Agreement. It mostly seemed unobjectionable. It discusses the linear relationship between warming and emissions, and how this allows one to define carbon budgets…

Models are failed hypotheses!

John Christy has written a report for the Global Warming Policy Foundation called climate models have been predicting too much warming. The basic conclusion of the report is that climate models predict far more warming in the tropical troposphere than…

The Carbon Cycle

Robert Rohde, who is lead scientist for Berkeley Earth, has created a really nice illustration of the carbon cycle. It shows how the CO2 cycles between the different carbon reservoirs, and how our emissions have perturbed the carbon cycle so…

The impact of 4C of global warming

On a number of occasions I’ve highlighted Kevin Anderson saying At 4oC most of the scientists I talk to about this, and the social scientists as well, would say it’s incompatible with organised global community. I don’t know if this…

The Guardian’s new style guide

It seems that the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment. It’s updated it’s preferred terms to include climate emergency, crisis or breakdown, instead of climate change and global heating, instead of global warming. Maybe most controversially,…

Shifting the Overton window

Stoat has a new post about there being two sorts of people in the world in which he says the GND is not just stupid but would in the unlikely event of it being imposed be actively harmful; and at…

If it seems obvious, it probably isn’t

There’s an interesting paper that someone (I forget who) highlighted on Twitter. It’a about when science becomes too easy. The basic idea is that there are pitfalls to popularising scientific information. Compared to experts, laypeople have not undergone any specialized…

The debate has changed

I’ve been finding it quite difficult to think of things to post about. One reason is that I’ve been rather busy. Another, though, is that I think the debate has changed. It seems that there is more and more discussion…

Is STS trivial?

In a recent Making Science Public post, Chris Toumey asked is STS trivial? Since I’ve written about Science and Technology Studies (STS) on a number of occasions, I found it an interesting post and posed a question in the comments.…

Social science

On a number of occasions I’ve seen suggestions that those who want to communicate the seriousness of climate change, should aim to understand the social sciences and should listen more to social scientists. I’m well aware that there’s much about…

Jonathan’s Funk

[The following is the second part of my chat with Jonathan. First part is here.] nowhmm, i need to find back eric‘s questionwhat is a reasonable number for how much of the american electrical grid could become renewable in the…

Climate Change – The Facts

I watched BBC One’s Climate Change – The Facts, narrated by David Attenborough. A pity about the title, as it’s the same as a book with authors that include Anthony Watts, Nigel Lawson and James Delingpole, but I thought it…

Six years

I’ve just been reminded by WordPress that this is the sixth anniversary of me starting this blog. I’m somewhat amazed that I’ve kept it going that long. I am, however, finding it more and more difficult to find things to…

Post-normal science

I’ve been reading a paper by Daniel Sarewitz, that was being highlighted by Jane Flegal on Twitter. The paper is called Of Cold Mice and Isotopes Or Should We Do Less Science?. There’s quite a lot that could be said…

Models and scenarios

I was following, or trying to, a Twitter discussion about models and scenarios. It was – I think – about models that forescast technology development, and you can find it here if you’re interested. I didn’t entirely follow it, but…

Existential threat?

I had a discussion with someone recently who asked if climate change really was an existential threat for humans. I responded that it wasn’t. However, I added that this didn’t mean that it couldn’t be severely disruptive or that it…

Jonathan’s Carrot and Stick

Jonathan Gilligan is Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences and Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Vanderbilt University, or so starts his media blurb. To me, Jonathan is the ClimateBall fellow I met at Keith’s ages ago.…

Public involvement in science

I had a brief discussion on Twitter yesterday about science communication, in which the other party seemed to be suggesting that we should recognise that lots of science comes up from the streets and that we should have more people…

The BBC’s lack of balance

Credit: John CookJust discovered that a new BBC Scotland news programme (The Nine) decided that it would invite Andrew Montford on to discuss the Youth Strike for Climate. Fortunately, no one else was willing to appear with him, so the…