attp

Recent Articles

Big news in the climate blogosphere!

I guess the big news in the climate blogosphere is that Judith Curry has resigned (retired from?) her tenured faculty position at Georgia Tech. One reason appears to be that Judith is disenchanted with today’s academia. I actually have some…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Residual airborne fraction

Hope everyone had a good, and safe, festive season. Towards the end of last year I wrote a couple of posts about the ocean carbonare cycle. I then ended up in a debate about what it would take to stabilise…
This article was posted in Blogs.

2016: A year in blogging

Since the year is almost over, I thought I would summarise some of what has gone on here. January was a rather quiet month. I wrote about a poignant essay by Piers Sellers, who sadly passed away just before Christmas.…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Merry Christmas

Just a quick post to wish everyone a Merry Christmas (or whatever season’s greeting seems most appropriate). Given what’s happening in the Arctic, the cartoon on the right seems apt. I really do hope that everyone has a very pleasant…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Tipping Point

So the tipping point was social. That thought — a wrong one I hope — came to mind in the aftermath of a US election that set back prospects for reducing greenhouse gas emissions before major ecosystem or physical tipping…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Why should anyone care?

Steve Fuller, who is a sociologist at the University of Warwick, recently wrote an article in the Guardian called Science has always been a bit post-truth. I thought it was confused. Others were somewhat blunter I have rarely read a…
This article was posted in Blogs.

No, stabilising emissions will not stabilise concentrations!

I’ve written before about stabilising temperatures; stabilising temperatures requires getting net anthropogenic emissions pretty close to zero. See, for example, this Realclimate post, or Solomon et al. (2008). Stabilising atmospheric concentrations, however, would not require getting emissions to zero, but…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Rose down the rabbit hole

To follow-up on his previous article, where he claimed that stunning new data indicates El Nino drove record highs in global temperatures suggesting rise may not be down to man-made emissions, David Rose has a new article in which he…
This article was posted in Blogs.

They’re coming for climate scientists!

Doug McNeall had a bit of a tweet-storm yesterday about some personal thoughts on communicating climate science, which he titled So, they’re coming for climate scientists (hence, my title). It caused some discussion on Twitter, and on another blog, to…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Poor Roger!

I wrote a post about Roger Pielke Jr’s recent Wall Street Journal article about his [u]nhappy life as a climate heretic, but it was rather long and rambling, so I can’t actually bring myself to post it. Instead, I’ll just…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Open data

Since I’m sitting at the station waiting for a train that is delayed 40 minutes, I thought I would post on something that I’ve been thinking about for the last couple of days. There is quite a lot of discussion…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Prospects for narrowing ECS bounds

I was just going to briefly mention a new paper by Stevens, Sherwood, Bony and Webb in which they present [p]rospects for narrowing bounds on Earth’s equilibrium climate sensitivity. The basic argument is similar to what has – at times…
This article was posted in Blogs.

It woz El Nino wot dunnit!

Credit : Gavin SchmidtIt looks likely that 2016 will end up as the warmest year in the surface temperature record. One question is whether or no the recent El Nino contributed significantly to this. As the figure on the right…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Watt about a 10th Anniversary?

When I started blogging about climate science, I mainly focussed on addressing what was said on Anthony Watt’s blog, Watts Up With That (WUWT) (and often started my post titles with the word “Watt”, as I’ve done again – for…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Negative emissions

I went to some Departmental talks recently and discovered that some of my colleagues are researchering possible carbon sequestration technologies. This could be very important, but appealing to negative emission technologies is often quite strongly criticised. The basic argument (which…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Non-linear climate sensitivity

Rather strangely, the recent Science Advances paper Nonlinear climate sensitivity and its implications for future greenhouse warming, that’s been getting some attention recently, made it into our Journal Club today (and it had nothing to do with me). It’s, consequently,…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Working with Trump?

Jack Stilgoe and Roger Pielke Jr have an article in the Guardian called They may not like it, but scientists must work with Donald Trump. My first impression was rather negative, but some on Twitter suggested that it was really…
This article was posted in Blogs.

What to say?

Another day, another surprising political result. I don’t really quite know what to say; this certainly seems to reflect a disatisfaction with some supposed political elite, but I don’t really understand why people think that voting for those who belong…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Sea surface warming and cloud feedbacks

I wrote a post a while agoe about a paper that was suggesting that the reason for the difference between the observationally-based estimates for climate sensitivity, and other estimates, was that the pattern of sea surface temperatures can produce different…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Ocean CO2 uptake – part 2

This is really a continuation of my post in which I tried to lay out the basic chemical reactions associated with the uptake of by the ocean. Nick Stokes has a similar post and has a nice online calculator. What…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Ocean CO2 uptake

This is a post I’ve been meaning to write for some time, and is partly motivated by a discussion Drikan and I have been having on another blog. It will probably end up being two posts, with this one simply…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The middle ground

Matt Ridley has been complaining about the frantic polarising on Twitter since his talk. When it was pointed out that frantic polarising is a euphemism for ‘lots of people disagree with my argument’, he responded with no it’s not. I…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Another 97%

In a previous post I mentioned that Richard Tol had published a paper on the structure of the climate debate. As I said in that post, the paper appears to be trying to portray the author as part of some…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Matt Ridley’s lecture

I thought I might make some points about Matt Ridley’s recent lecture. There are two general points I want to make. Matt Ridley might have a PhD (DPhil technically) and he might have published some papers in the 1980s, but…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Like a Boss

Jim Steele struck again at Judy’s: after walrus science and coral bleaching, he audited Gaia herself. In the walrus episode, I made around 50 comments; Brandon Gates spent 75 in the bleaching one. The Gaia episode only feature 20 or…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The Royal Society and the GWPF

A couple of weeks ago, it came out that the Royal Society had hired space for an event being run by the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF). The event turns out to be a lecture by Matt Ridley, who I…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Guest Post: Post-Factual Perceptions of Weather

Adversarial interactions between physical and social scientists are sometimes seen around this blog, so I’m happy to report on something different. The occasion is a new paper in the 50th anniversary issue of Sociology, flagship journal of the British Sociological…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Thinking like a planet

Adam Frank has a recent article called Climate change and the astrobiology of the anthropocene. The premise of the article is that we should think of climate change in terms of astrobiology and, in particular, the habitabilty of planets and…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Spiral density waves

There was an interesting (non-climate) paper in Science, by Laura Perez and colleagues, about Spiral density waves in a young protoplanetary discs. Essentially, they used the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a young stellar object (Elias 2-27) in…
This article was posted in Blogs.