attp

Recent Articles

It’s complicated, and it’s coupled

Matt Ridley, whose writings I’ve discussed before has a new article in The Times called we are more than a match for hurricanes, that essentially argues that [w]hether or not tropical storms are becoming fiercer, our growing wealth and ingenuity…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Portable POMO

Five paragraphs from Michel Foucault ought to be enough to dig POMO. Let’s take those that start his concluding remarks to the Seminar Discourse and Truth: the Problematization of Parrhesia. Parrhesia refers to the act of speaking candidly: My intention…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Prior knowledge

Something I have been bothered about for some time now, is how we best discuss climate change in the context of extreme events. Given the devastation from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, damaging floods in South Asia and Nigeria, and the…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Beyond equilibrium climate sensitivity

Since I’ve written about climate sensitivity before, and since I have a few free moments, I thought I would briefly highlight a new paper by Knutti, Rugenstein, and Hegerl called Beyond Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity. It’s really a review of a…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Climate model tuning

I wrote a post about model tuning that discussed a paper that argued for more transparency in how climate models are tuned. Gavin Schmidt, and colleagues, have now published a paper that discusses the Practice and philosophy of climate model…
This article was posted in Blogs.

A retrospective about engaging online

Philip Moriarty wrote a post about engaging online called rules of engagement: seven lessions from communicating above and below the line. Philip’s experiences are quite negative, and he has mostly stopped engaging on social media. I had said that I…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Be wealthy

Bret Stephens has a new op-ed in the New York Times about Hurricanes, Harvey and the Capitalist Offset. His conclusion is that the storm will be a speed bump to Houston’s economy and that [t]he best lesson the world can…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Extreme weather events

Gavin Schmidt had an interesting Twitter thread about discussing the link between extreme weather events and climate change. I’ve included an image of the thread on the right (click on it to expand) but the basic suggestion (with which I…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Early 20th century warming

I’ve been involved in a discussion on another blog (which I won’t highlight) about there being a period of warming in the early 20th century that seems comparable to the warming we’ve experienced since about 1980. This is a somewhat…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Machine unlearning

Credit: xkcd.Someone sent me a paper by John Abott and Jennifer Marohasy called the application of machine learning for evaluating anthropogenic versus natural climate change. Their conclusion is that most of the observed warming could be natural and that the…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Kate Marvel on clouds

Although we are confident that adding greenhouse gases to the atmosphere will cause the planet to warm, exactly how much we will warm is uncertain (the IPCC likely range for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 is 1.5oC to 4.5oC). A…
This article was posted in Blogs.

STS: All talk and no walk?

In my previous post I discussed a paper by Harry Collins, and colleagues, that is mainly a response to an editorial by Sergio Sismondo. Collins et al. argue that Science and Technology Studies (STS) must take some responsibility for today’s…
This article was posted in Blogs.

STS as science or politics?

I came across a paper by Harry Collins, Robert Evans, and Martin Weinel called STS as science or politics? For those who don’t know, STS stands for Science and Technology Studies and I have written about it before. I haven’t…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Science; it’s complicated

I mentioned, a while ago, that I’d been at a meeting and had an idea for a post. Well, this is my attempt to articulate what I thought at that meeting. A good deal of my own research involves trying…
This article was posted in Blogs.

A brief roundup: the BBC and OMICS

I guess the big news yesterday was the BBC Radio 4 Today show interviews with Al Gore and Nigel Lawson. If you want to listen, the broadcast is here. Al Gore is on at about 1h10m and Nigel Lawson is…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Manichean paranoia

Some have encouraged me to watch Roger Pielke Jr’s presentation on Climate politics as a manichean paranoia, and I have now done so (slides here, and I’ll post the video at the end of the post.). Manichean paranoia refers to…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The Linear Model for Richies

Not long ago, Richie contended that sticking to presenting true information and letting otters decide what to do, given that information, was “the neatest little summary of the linear model.” This short note should suffice to show that this claim…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Beyond climate consensus

I’ve had a chance to read the recent Beyond Climate Consensus paper by Warren Pearce, Reiner Grundmann, and colleagues. I’ve only just realised that it cites my blog, which might be a first. The paper itself is a Commentary, rather…
This article was posted in Blogs.

I’m back….almost

Okay, I’m not quite back. I’m on the ferry from Coll to Oban (the picture is actually taken on the trip from Oban to Coll – the weather now is not that great). We’ve spent a week doing what I…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Off for a couple of weeks

I’m leaving for a meeting early tomorrow morning and then heading out on holiday as soon as I’m back, so posting – from me, at least – will probably be light for a couple of weeks. To be quite honest,…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Doomsday scenarios

There’s been a bit of a furore over an article called The Uninhabitable Earth by David Wallace-Wells. The goal was clearly to investigate some of the extreme scenarios, but – unfortunately – the article got a number of things wrong…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Proposing A Non-Cynical Red Team Exercise

(Guest posting by Michael Tobis. Opinions expressed here are mt’s only.) Some people who dismiss the climate change issue like to call it “the CAGW hypothesis” for “Catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming”. The name is quadruply irritating, inasmuch as 1) a…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Hawking is wrong

I guess the big alarmist news at the moment is that Stephen Hawking has been quoted as saying: Trump’s action could push the Earth over the brink, to become like Venus, with a temperature of two hundred and fifty degrees,…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Temperature targets

I realise Michael Tobis is planning a follow-up to his post, but I thought would quickly pen this post about temperature targets, for example the Paris target of keeping the increase in global average temperature to well below 2°C above…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The Only Way Not To Lose Is to Play

(Guest article by Michael Tobis; opinions are mt’s only) There’s a lot of talk about a “red team” critique of climate science from the quarters that have aligned themselves as critics of the mainstream. This has recently been taken up…
This article was posted in Blogs.