attp

Recent Articles

Why a reasonably stable climate?

Came across a nice paper today suggesting that Future climate forcing potentially without precedent in the last 420 million years, by Foster, Royer & Lunt (I say nice because I found it quite easy to understand, not because what it…
This article was posted in Blogs.

It’s okay to lie?

The House of Commons Science and Technology committee have just concluded an inquiry into science communication. One of those who presented evidence was David Whitehouse of the Global Warming Policy Foundation. David Whitehouse’s evidence focussed mainly on science journalism, and…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Democratising science

I got into a brief discussion on Twitter about democratising science, which some people seemed to think was a good idea. One thing I was trying to do was simply to work out what people meant. I’m still not sure,…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Bias in science

There are quite often claims that there are significant biases in science and that this is strongly influencing research results. Typically this is based on known problems in certain fields; the replication crisis in psychology, or the failure to publish…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Based on Observations Only!

The Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), who I’ve written about many times before, have released a report which they’ve described as [t]he World’s first state of the climate survey based on observations only. I think it’s meant to the a…
This article was posted in Blogs.

A reduced climate sensitivity!

Now that I have your attention, I should probably make clear that this post is not about the Earth. I’m just back from a meeting where one of the speakers was Ian Boutle, lead author of a paper in which…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The feedback paradox

Realclimate has a new post, by Ramus Benestad, that discusses predcitable and unpredictable behaviour. It focuses a little on Judith Curry’s recent report about climate models, that I discussed here. The Realclimate post is well worth reading, and I encourage…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Matt Ridley responds to Tim Palmer

I came across a response, by Matt Ridley, to Tim Palmer’s talk. I’ve posted Matt Ridley’s response below. One interesting aspect of his response is that it is written as if he is someone with the expertise to actually debate…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Informing versus convincing

I want to clarify something about yesterday’s post that seems to have at least got one person up in arms. The key point that I was trying to get across (and that I think is the same as Michael Tobis’s…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Scientists are not salespeople!

Gavin Schmidt posted a bunch of tweets in response to a post by Scott Adams (of Dilbert fame) in which he claims to illustrate how climate scientists can persude skeptics. It you want to read Gavin’s tweet, Greg Laden has…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The Ivory Tower

This is a post I’ve been thinking about for a while, and my thoughts are still not fully fleshed out, but I’ll have a go at writing it anyway. You sometimes encounter a suggestion that academics regard themselves as living…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Advocacy and scientific credibility

To the surprise of few, I suspect, it appears that scientists can advocate without damaging their, or the scientific community’s, credibility. It’s reported in this paper, [d]oes Engagement in Advocacy Hurt the Credibility of Scientists? and is discussed in this…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Oh no, not again

Somehow a paper arguing that the increase in atmospheric CO2 is mostly natural has managed to pass peer-review. Gavin’s already covered it in a Realcimate post. Gavin Cawleys paper is, in a sense, a pre-emptive response to this new paper.…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Intellectual monocultures

I came across an article that I’ve been thinking about for a few days. I thought I would simply post some thoughts. They may not be well-formed, and my views could certainly change. I should say that I got it…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Guest post: On Baselines and Buoys

One of the key criticisms of Karl et al. (2015) is that it used a dataset that adjusted buoy data up to ship data – the suggestion being that, in doing so, they produced more apparent warming than if the…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Messing about with model-obs comparisons

I was just messing about with some model-observation comparison and just thought I would post some of the results. I don’t claim that I’ve done these properly, so use with care. I will, however, explain what I did, so that…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Doing science

This whole furore about Karl et al. has got me thinking more about how we actually conduct science/research. There is, I think, a perception that doing science/research involves following a fairly well defined set of procedures about which there should…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Effective Science communication?

I came across a post by Jon Tennant called science, echo chambers, and why facts are never enough. The basic idea is that people don’t really use science in rational ways, that publicly scientists can often end up mainly occupying…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Watt about four key charts?

I don’t look at Anthony Watts’s blog, Watts Up With That (WUWT), very often, but I glanced at it today and noticed a guest post called four key charts for a climate change skeptic. Anthony Watts’s pre-amble says Skeptics often…
This article was posted in Blogs.

A new baseline?

Ed Hawkins and colleagues have a new paper called Estimating changes in global temperature since pre-industrial times, which Ed also discusses in this post. The basic suggestion seems to be that we should probably be defining pre-industrial as the period…
This article was posted in Blogs.

Clutching at straws GWPF style

Since I have a few minutes spare I thought I would highlight another laugh aloud post from the Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF). It’s about Arctic sea ice growing back to 2006 levels. Wow, amazing, what a turnaround after spending…
This article was posted in Blogs.

The warmest year…again

I haven’t, yet, written anything about 2016 becoming the warmest year in record. That’s partly because it appears to have been virtually certain that it would be for a few months now, and partly because it’s been extensively covered elsewhere.…
This article was posted in Blogs.