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Recent Articles

A real time global warming index

This is a guest post by Karsten Haustein, a researcher in the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford. The post is about a new paper that discusses their real time global warming index. Have you…
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I’m confused….

Recently, Warren Pearce and colleagues published a paper called [b]eyond climate consensus which I wrote about here. There was a response from John Cook, one from Naomi Oreskes, and a Guardian article by multiple authors. So, why am I confused?…
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If it’s a fight?

I’ve had very little to say recently, and still don’t have much to say. However, just to keep things ticking over, I thought I would highlight this David Roberts article called [c]onservatives probably can’t be persuaded on climate change. So…
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Jordan Peterson speaks the truth

I may, justifiably, be accused of this post having a clickbait title. What it refers to, though, is a youtube debate between Philip Moriarty (a Physics Professor at the University of Nottingham) and Fred McVittie (whose credentials I, unfortunately, do…
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Carbon Dioxide Removal

There’s a bit of a debate going on a about economics and ethics, mostly on MT’s blog, but also on Stoat, and a little bit here. I have to be honest, I’m not entirely sure what people are actually disagreeing…
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Civility

A recent discussion has led me to think a bit more about civility. This was partly motivated by my own intention to maintain it when I started this blog (which didn’t always succeed) and by the other party being someone…
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Sound Science

By some serendipity, I noticed and responded to a tweet where Kevin Folta was trying to ridicule the accusation that he was “pro-GMO”: How about "pro-artificial plant-growth environments" or simply "pro-biotech"? Self-serving caricatures won't make social labeling disappear. — willard…
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Bruno Latour

I came across an interesting Bruno Latour, a sociologist, with an interest in Science and Techology Studies (STS), who was involved with what has been called the “science wars”. I actually found much of what he said in the interview…
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Economics and Values

Michael Tobis has a post in which he argues that what we are doing to the climate will persist for many generations and, consequently, that it is immoral to continue what were’e doing and that we should address this as…
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The Virial Theorem

I had another brief Twitter discussion with Ned Nikolov, whose paper I discussed in this post. Ned seems to think that there is no atmospheric greenhouse effect and that the enhanced surface temperature is due to atmospheric pressure somehow enhancing…
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A bit more about clouds

A few years ago I posted a video by Andrew Dessler that was discussing whether or not Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity could be less than 3oC. The bottom line was that the best estimate for ECS is about 3oC. Given that…
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Chatham Air Raid

For the 100th anniversay of the start of World War I, I wrote a post about an ancester of mine, Kenneth Smith, who died on 1 January 1919, when Her Majesty’s Yacht Iolaire sank after hitting rocks in the mouth…
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A Harde response

Earlier this year, I wrote a post about a paper by Hermann Harde that argued that most of the rise in atmospheric CO2 was natural. If you want more details of why this suggestion is nonsense, you can read my…
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A bit more about committed warming

On a number of occasions I’ve pointed out that our warming committment is not actually the equilibrium temperature to our current atmospheric concentration because, if we halted all emissions, atmospheric CO2 would drop as the natural sinks took up more…
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A bit more about carbon budgets

I’ve been mostly at home today since we had a power cut at work and the site ended up being closed. So, I thought I would post a few more thoughts about the Millar et al. 1.5oC carbon budget paper.…
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Climateball, GWPF style

I came across a Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF) post called climate scientists shoot the messenger. That it’s from the Forum, rather than the Foundation, may be relevant. It discusses the recent Millar et al. paper (that I discussed here…
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Assessing global warming

A couple of years ago I wrote a joint post with Roger Pielke Sr that discussed assessing anthropogenic global warming. The post basically used changes in ocean heat content to assess anthropogenic global warming. The basic idea (which is not…
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Own goal

I thought I might comment a bit further on the recent Millar et al. paper, [e]mission budgets and pathways consistent with limiting warming to 1.5 °C, that I discussed in this post. I’ve found the whole public dialogue about this…
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Andy Skuce

As many probably already know, Andy Skuce passed away last week. Andy was someone I greatly respected who made a significant, positive contribution to the dialogue about climate and energy. Andy was a key contributor to Skeptical Science, and wrote…
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More time …. really?

A recent paper about [e]mission budgets and pathways consistent with limiting warming to 1.5 °C essentially argues that it is still possible to follow an emission pathway that will give us a good chance of keeping warming below 1.5oC. More…
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It’s complicated, and it’s coupled

Matt Ridley, whose writings I’ve discussed before has a new article in The Times called we are more than a match for hurricanes, that essentially argues that [w]hether or not tropical storms are becoming fiercer, our growing wealth and ingenuity…
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Portable POMO

Five paragraphs from Michel Foucault ought to be enough to dig POMO. Let’s take those that start his concluding remarks to the Seminar Discourse and Truth: the Problematization of Parrhesia. Parrhesia refers to the act of speaking candidly: My intention…
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Prior knowledge

Something I have been bothered about for some time now, is how we best discuss climate change in the context of extreme events. Given the devastation from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, damaging floods in South Asia and Nigeria, and the…
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Beyond equilibrium climate sensitivity

Since I’ve written about climate sensitivity before, and since I have a few free moments, I thought I would briefly highlight a new paper by Knutti, Rugenstein, and Hegerl called Beyond Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity. It’s really a review of a…
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Climate model tuning

I wrote a post about model tuning that discussed a paper that argued for more transparency in how climate models are tuned. Gavin Schmidt, and colleagues, have now published a paper that discusses the Practice and philosophy of climate model…
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A retrospective about engaging online

Philip Moriarty wrote a post about engaging online called rules of engagement: seven lessions from communicating above and below the line. Philip’s experiences are quite negative, and he has mostly stopped engaging on social media. I had said that I…
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Be wealthy

Bret Stephens has a new op-ed in the New York Times about Hurricanes, Harvey and the Capitalist Offset. His conclusion is that the storm will be a speed bump to Houston’s economy and that [t]he best lesson the world can…
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